With so many aspects to be kept under consideration as part of an equipment condition monitoring system, organizations must ensure that all applications are operating efficiently to guarantee the success of the program.

The technological age has affected every industry vertical, including businesses who utilize large, key pieces of machinery for production. Currently, condition monitoring systems are no longer single mechanism arrangements, and can include a variety of programs and devices to measure and maintain equipment reliability.

With so many aspects to take into consideration as part of an equipment condition monitoring system, organizations must ensure that all applications are operating efficiently to guarantee the success of the monitoring program. Reliable Plant stated that the desire to succeed should be a key pillar within condition monitoring efforts, especially for key employees and decision makers.

"The manager's attitude toward condition monitoring as a part of the overall maintenance strategy is what keeps the rest of the maintenance department focused," Reliable Plant stated.

In other words, higher ups within a company must be motivated by a need for success and set an example, especially by following frequently overlooked policies. Their attitude and actions will lead the way for other employees to maintain an optimal condition monitoring system.

For example, GraybaR advised industrial organizations to store loose cords and potentially dangerous cables in cord reels as a means to keep them out of the way of workers and moving parts of machinery. While an effort of this kind may seem small, it is nonetheless important. If managers openly practice this kind of maintenance, other employees will follow in their footsteps.

Employee Education
Another key aspect of equipment monitoring system management is workforce education, according to Reliable Plant. The source stated that supervisors and other higher-ups should be made aware of the condition monitoring technologies in place within the facility, how each operates and the impact of the technology within the organization. Once these critical employees are educated on the different systems, they can pass the knowledge down to other workers. Reliable Plant stated that one organization held monthly "lunch and learn" sessions for small groups of employees, where condition monitoring systems were discussed and proper use demonstrated for optimal understanding. Each session was sectioned off and had a dedicated focus on one specific aspect of the system. This way, employees were given an in depth look at each mechanism's inner workings, instead of a less informative summary.

GreybaR also recommended that workers do not overlook maintenance of the condition monitoring mechanisms themselves. While these systems monitor equipment reliability and allow for predictive preventive maintenance, employees should be sure to check the technology on a regular basis to ensure that it is operating properly.